African-Americans with Alzheimer’s Have Lower Expression of 2 Common Biomarkers, Study Finds

African-Americans with Alzheimer’s Have Lower Expression of 2 Common Biomarkers, Study Finds
African-Americans have lower expression of two biomarkers of Alzheimer's, suggesting a possible race-dependent biological mechanism that contributes to the development of the disease, a study shows. This discrepancy between African-American and white patients is particularly relevant for those who carry the ApoE4 variant of the ApoE gene. The study, “Assessment of Racial Disparities in Biomarkers for Alzheimer Disease,” was published in the journal JAMA neurology. African-Americans represent 13.3 percent of the population in the United States. However, they are often under-represented in the patient populations included in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials, which are largely formed by white research volunteers. While some prior studies have investigated potential racial differences in Alzheimer’s — particularly between African-Americans and non-Hispanic white individuals — results are often conflicting. For example, some studies have found that African-Americans are at a higher risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s, while other studies have not found any racial differences. Similar discrepancies exist in studies that have attempted to investigate whether there are any differences in the biological mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease between African-Americans and white individuals. In particular, little is known about any potential differences in the expression of molecular biomarkers of disease. A biomarker is a measurable substanc
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *