Gum Disease Bacteria May Play Role in Alzheimer’s Disease Development, Study Suggests

Gum Disease Bacteria May Play Role in Alzheimer’s Disease Development, Study Suggests
Porphyomonas gingivalis, a bacteria that causes a type of gum disease known as chronic periodontitis, was found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, providing evidence of its possible role in the disease's development, a study reports. The release of toxic enzymes from this bacteria was blocked by a particular inhibitor that is currently in clinical studies, which reduced neuroinflammation and stopped the accumulation of Alzheimer’s-related beta-amyloid protein, according to the researchers. The study, “Porphyromonas gingivalis in Alzheimer’s disease brains: Evidence for disease causation and treatment with small-molecule inhibitors,” was published in Science Advances. Chronic periodontitis and infection with Porphyomonas gingivalis have been identified as significant risk factors for developing beta-amyloid plaques, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease with P. gingivalis gum disease, scientists observed impaired cognition and an increased buildup of Alzheimer’s-like plaques. Additionally, molecules present in the outer membrane of this bacteria have been found in the brains of human Alzheimer’s patients, suggesting that this type of bacterial infection may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. P. gingivalis produces toxic enzymes known as gingipains, which can mediate the toxicity of P. gi
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