Sleep Molecules May Represent a New Blood Biomarker for Earlier Diagnosis, Study Suggests

Sleep Molecules May Represent a New Blood Biomarker for Earlier Diagnosis, Study Suggests
High blood levels of primary fatty acid amides (PFAMS), a class of fatty molecules involved in sleep and movement control, are associated with increased accumulation of beta-amyloid protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease, a study finds. Researchers believe that this class of fatty molecules may represent a new blood biomarker that can help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's earlier. The study, "Primary fatty amides in plasma associated with brain amyloid burden, hippocampal volume, and memory in the European Medical Information Framework for Alzheimer's Disease biomarker discovery cohort," was published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the formation of plaques made of a protein called beta-amyloid. These protein clumps accumulate between nerve cells in the brain, disrupting their ability to communicate with each other and impairing their function. It is believed that these plaques start to form many years before the onset of the first Alzheimer's symptoms, known as the preclinical phase of the disease. "It is thought that one of the reasons for the failure of [therapy] candidates is that they were not administered during the preclinical phase of the disea
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *