Electromagnetic Device Improves Cognition in Alzheimer’s Patients, Small Study Finds

Electromagnetic Device Improves Cognition in Alzheimer’s Patients, Small Study Finds
NeuroEM Therapeutics's MemorEMTM — a head-worn device that uses electromagnetic waves — has shown promising results in a preliminary clinical trial of people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. Seven of eight participants demonstrated improved memory after two months of treatment. The results, "A Clinical Trial of Transcranial Electromagnetic Treatment in Alzheimer’s Disease: Cognitive Enhancement and Associated Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid, Blood, and Brain Imaging," were published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. MemorEMTM is an investigational technology that uses Transcranial Electromagnetic Treatment (TEMT). It is a cap that sends specialized electromagnetic waves through the brain. It is designed to be worn during daily activities, and for easy placement by a caregiver. Previous studies in mice suggested that TEMT could help break up clumps of the proteins amyloid-beta and tau in the brain. Such clumps are thought to be major drivers of Alzheimer's pathology, but finding therapies that can get all the way into brain cells and then disassociate the clumps has been a major challenge. TEMT may be able to circumvent that. In this first in-human study (NCT02958930), which was funded by NeuroEM Therapeutics, eight participants (two men, six women, average age 71 years) were treated with TEMT via MemorEMTM for two months. Sessions were administered for an hour twice daily; in total, each participant received about 120 hour-long sessions. The
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