Neflamapimod Fails to Improve Memory But Shows Impact on Tau Levels in Phase 2b Study, EIP Pharma Announces

Neflamapimod Fails to Improve Memory But Shows Impact on Tau Levels in Phase 2b Study, EIP Pharma Announces
A Phase 2b study of oral neflamapimod in treating mild Alzheimer’s disease met its secondary goals of statistically significant drops in phospho-tau and tau protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of treated patients compared to those given a placebo, EIP Pharma announced. But the trial failed to show evidence of better episodic memory after 24 weeks of treatment, its primary goal, the treatment's developer said. A significant decrease in phospho-tau and tau proteins — two known markers of neurodegeneration — support neflamapimod's ability in these secondary study goals: target engagement and  mechanism proof-of-concept. Neflamapimod, an oral small molecule, specifically targets amyloid-beta and tau proteins. It is able to reach the brain and is designed to inhibit the enzyme p38-alpha, a critical player in the dysfunctional nerve cell connections that cause memory deficits in Alzheimer’s patients. The Phase 2b study, known as REVERSE-SD (NCT03402659), enrolled 161 people with early stage (mild) Alzheimer's at sites across Europe and the United States. Patients were randomized to either placebo or neflamapimod at 40 mg twice daily for six months. The primary goal was improvements in episodic memory (consciously recalled memories of past experiences), evaluated using the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) and the
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