Phase 2 Trial to Test New Way of Measuring Tau Plaques in Living Brains

Phase 2 Trial to Test New Way of Measuring Tau Plaques in Living Brains
A newly opened Phase 2 clinical trial will test the sensitivity of new imaging tool for plaque buildup in the brains of people with mild cognitive impairment and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, Aprinoia Therapeutics announced. The trial is set to enroll 130 adults, 50 to 85 years old, a mix of patients and healthy volunteers, and it is currently recruiting at its single site in Connecticut. More information can be found here. A hallmark of Alzheimer's is the accumulation of clumps of irregularly folded proteins, often called plaques, in the brain. Understanding how these plaques form, how they change over the course of the disease — and, ultimately, ways to prevent or reverse this process — are goals of a lot of Alzheimer's research. One type of plaque with particular relevance to Alzheimer's disease are plaques formed by a protein called tau. This open-label Phase 2 trial (NCT04141150) will test a new imaging agent called 18F-APN-1607. In simplest terms, 18F-APN-1607 can bind to tau plaques in the brain. The agent is designed to then be detected via positron emission tomography (PET) scans, allowing scientists to visualize tau plaques in the brains of living people. Conceptually, this could allow for advances like monitoring plaques to provide patients with more accurate information on their disea
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