‘Asian Glow’ Mutation, Alcohol May Increase Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s, Study Suggests

‘Asian Glow’ Mutation, Alcohol May Increase Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s, Study Suggests
Individuals, especially east Asians who carry a mutation in a key enzyme involved in alcohol metabolism, have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease as a consequence of regular alcohol consumption, according to recent research. The study, “Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity and aldehydic load contribute to neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease related pathology,” was published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications. A recent study revealed that a mutation in a specific part of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene, represented by the abbreviation ALDH2*2, may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, this mutation in ALDH2, which is much more common in east Asian countries where nearly half the population carries it, has been associated with facial redness following alcohol consumption, a phenomenon commonly referred to as “Asian glow.” This manifestation is triggered by ALDH2's inability to effectively detoxify the body from acetaldehyde, a toxic product of alcohol metabolism, leading to its accumulation. Drinking alcohol on a regular basis been has show to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's. Because ALDH2 is one of the key enzymes involved in the detoxification of acetaldehyde in the body, mutations that result in a deficiency in this enzyme further promote ethanol-med
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