Early Onset Dementia, AD Diagnoses Rose 200% in 4 Years, BCBSA Report Finds

Early Onset Dementia, AD Diagnoses Rose 200% in 4 Years, BCBSA Report Finds

The number of commercially insured U.S. residents diagnosed with early onset dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) rose by 200% from 2013 to 2017, and the average age of a person living with either condition was 49, according to a new Blue Cross Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) report.

Titled “Early-Onset Dementia and Alzheimer’s Rates Grow for Younger American Adults,” the report is part of the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BSBS), The Health of America Report series, which uses advanced analytics to uncover key healthcare trends and insights into care affordability and access. The BCBSA and Blue Health Intelligence collaborated to produce the report, which is based on information from the BCBS Axis, a database of medical claims from more than 48 million BCBS customers. This is the series’ 29th report. The report states that, in 2017, about 131,000 people between the ages 30 and 64 were diagnosed with either early onset dementia or AD. That’s an increase from 4.2 diagnoses for every 10,000 adults in 2013, to 12.6 diagnoses per 100,000 in 2017.
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