Half of Primary Physicians Say U.S. is Unprepared for Growing Alzheimer’s Demands

Half of Primary Physicians Say U.S. is Unprepared for Growing Alzheimer’s Demands
An Alzheimer’s Association survey of primary care physicians found that while 87% expect the number of dementia patients to rise within the next five years, half say the U.S. health system is unprepared for the increased burden. The annual report, “Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures," provides insight into the latest national data on Alzheimer’s prevalence, incidence, mortality, costs of care, and impact on caregivers. It was released March 11. A first-time auxiliary report, “On the Front Lines: Primary Care Physicians and Alzheimer’s Care in America,” takes a look at the experiences, training, exposure and attitudes associated with dementia care among primary care physicians (PCPs) and new medical school and residency program graduates. “The perspectives of primary care physicians raise an important alarm regarding the current reality and future of dementia care in this country,” said Joanne Pike, chief program officer for the Alzheimer’s Association, in a press release. “The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is increasing, and primary care physicians, who are the front line of providing care, are telling us the medical profession is not prepared to meet the future demand," she said. "The Alzheimer’s Association is committed to working with physici
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