Technique That Opens Blood-Brain Barrier May Help Target Treatment, Study Says

Technique That Opens Blood-Brain Barrier May Help Target Treatment, Study Says
A new non-invasive technique that can temporarily “open” the blood-brain barrier may make it easier for promising therapies to enter the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease, a study reports.  The study, “Noninvasive hippocampal blood−brain barrier opening in Alzheimer’s disease with focused ultrasound,” was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The blood-brain barrier is made of a “wall” of cells tightly bound together by protein structures called tight junctions that act like a kind of “cement.” This barrier surrounds blood vessels in the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system or CNS) to separate the bloodstream from the tissues within the CNS and prevent the passage of cells, particles, or microbes that might disrupt the normal function of the CNS. However, when it comes to therapies to treat brain disorders, the blood-brain barrier also limits the use of potentially effective medicines,
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