Simple Language Test May Predict Alzheimer’s Onset Years Before Symptoms Start

Simple Language Test May Predict Alzheimer’s Onset Years Before Symptoms Start
A simple language test, when combined with an artificial intelligence model, can predict which people will develop Alzheimer’s disease later in life, a study shows. This new model predicted Alzheimer’s seven years before its diagnosis with an accuracy of 70%, according to the study. That rate is higher than those attained by traditional predictive methods, such as neuropsychological testing, the researchers said. These findings may help in the development of simple, non-invasive, and inexpensive language tests to help clinicians assess a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Such assessments, in turn, can lead to earlier interventions, the investigators noted. The study, “Linguistic markers predict onset of Alzheimer’s disease,” was published in the journal The Lancet eClinicalMedicine. Increasing efforts are being made to develop easier, low-cost, reliable biomarkers of pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s that allow clinicians to predict whether and when a person will develop the disease. While there is still no effective cure or preventive treatment for Alzheimer’s, the earlier clinicians can detect it, the more likely they will potentially be able to delay and treat its progression. “Aging-related cognitive decline manifests itself in almost all aspects of language comprehension and production,” the researchers wrote, noting that “even seemingly mundane linguistic abilities, such as object naming, engage
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