Don’t Let Alzheimer’s Disease Steal Thanksgiving

Don’t Let Alzheimer’s Disease Steal Thanksgiving
As exampled by the Pilgrims and the Indigenous people who graced the first Thanksgiving table, families in the United States gather each year to give thanks. The gateway to Christmas and Hanukkah, Thanksgiving sets the season’s tone. How appropriate to begin with thankfulness before gifting one another with Hanukkah or Christmas presents. It is a rare person who searches their soul without finding something for which to be grateful on Thanksgiving. Alzheimer’s disease is probably not at the top of your list. The average caregiver doesn’t awaken each morning with gratefulness that their loved one has been diagnosed with dementia. However, within the sphere of living with the disease, there are still multiple things for which to be thankful. Dig out those nuggets from the recesses of your heart. It may take a bit of mining, but gratefulness will dislodge when you begin counting your blessings. Alzheimer’s has stolen enough. Don’t allow it to steal the holidays, too. Caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease may be tempted to forego celebrating the holidays. For overwhelmed caregivers, concentrating on the celebratory aspects of Thanksgiving followed by Christmas or Hanukkah is difficult. It’s hard to get to the happy parts, if you know what I mean. There’s a gray cloud that permeates the surrounding air with loss. The joy of preparing a golden turkey or decorating the house for a cheery celebration seems more of a chore than in past seasons. Also, we’re tempted to skip the holidays because our loved one won’t remember celebrating them anyway. Thanksgiving is just like any other day of the week to them, as each day runs into the next. If we’re not careful, it will become the norm for us, too, as caregivers. Do not let this happen. T
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