Glycotoxins in Over-Cooked Food May Increase Susceptibility to Dementia

Glycotoxins in Over-Cooked Food May Increase Susceptibility to Dementia
shutterstock_217595182A new study led by a team of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York recently revealed that compounds called glycotoxins found in over-cooked foods may increase the risk for age-related dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease the most common type of dementia. The study is entitled “Oral glycotoxins are a modifiable cause of dementia and the metabolic syndrome in mice and humans” and was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Diet is known to influence cognitive function. Caloric restriction in particular has a positive result in the aging brain, and this is thought to be through the restoration of a protein called sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a protein involved in the regulation of neuronal, endocrine and immune responses that was found to be down-regulated in disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and metabolic syndrome, an obesity-related disorder linked to hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Glycotoxins, also called advanced glycation end products (AGEs), abundant in cooked, heated, fried or grilled food products at high temperatures, correspond to a class of agents that have been reported to be contributing factors in the development of chronic diseases
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