Researchers Review the Amyloid Hypothesis Potential to Yield a Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers Review the Amyloid Hypothesis Potential to Yield a Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers at the University of Glasgow recently published in the journal Future Science OA a comprehensive review regarding the inhibition of beta-amyloid production as a therapeutic strategy for patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The study is entitled “The role and therapeutic targeting of α-, β— and γ-secretase in Alzheimer's disease.” Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder where individuals initially experience memory loss and confusion that gradually leads to behavior and personality changes, a decline in cognitive abilities, and ultimately the severe loss of mental function. The disease is characterized by the loss of neurons responsible for memory and learning, and brain formation of amyloid plaques [aggregates of beta-amyloid proteins derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP)]. Alzheimer's disease is estimated to affect more than 36 million individuals worldwide, being the most common form of dementia in the elderly population. Currently there are no drugs available to either stop or stabilize disease progression. The so-called “amyloid hypothesis” suggests that the accumulation of beta-amyloid proteins within brain tissues is the trigger event for Alzheimer’s disease development, and therefore it should be inhibited. In this review, the research team analyzed studies where the formation of beta-amyloid proteins was inhibited by interfering with the activity of specific proteolytic secretases that transform APP into beta-amyloid, and assess whether this appr
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