Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Specific Immune Cells

Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Specific Immune Cells
Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center recently published in the journal Brain a new promising immune therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease using mice models. The study is entitled “Therapeutic effects of glatiramer acetate and grafted CD115+ monocytes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease”. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive and behavioral problems. It is the most common form of dementia in the elderly with patients initially experiencing memory loss and confusion that gradually leads to behavior and personality changes, a decline in cognitive abilities and ultimately to severe loss of mental function. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the brain formation of amyloid plaques (composed of beta-amyloid proteins), and the loss of the connection between neurons that are responsible for memory and learning leading to their eventual death. It has been previously reported that immune cells upon exposure to high concentrations of the toxic beta-amyloid protein in the brain can no longer attack and resolve plaque formation. As disease progresses, these immune cells turn defective, becoming themselves toxic to the neurons and contributing to the detrimental inflammation process. “These cells appear to work in the brain in several ways to counter the negative effects associated with Alzheimer's disease,” explained the study’s senior author Dr. Maya Koronyo-Hamaoui in a
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