Researchers Develop New Device To Measure Alzheimer’s Patients’ Brain Function

Researchers Develop New Device To Measure Alzheimer’s Patients’ Brain Function
In a new study entitled “Critical Flicker Fusion Predicts Executive Function in Younger and Older Adults,” a team of researchers developed a new device that allows for a precise assessment of an individuals’ visual processing speed, i.e., how fast can a person can understand visual information. This device is a potential new strategy for assessing early cognitive impairments associated with neurologic disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. The study was published in the journal Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. Critical flicker fusion (CFF), a measure of visual processing speed, is a parameter underlying several cognitive functions. In this study, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) Neuropsychology and Memory Assessment Laboratory in collaboration with researchers at the Vision Sciences Laboratory designed a device that measures processing speed through sight. Catherine Mewborn, a doctoral candidate in UGA’s Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of psychology and study first author commented in a press release, “We knew that sensory function is important for cognitive function, and we had a unique opportunity with this collaboration.” The team designed a device that measures an individual's critical flicker fusion. Study participants looked into the device that flashes when alternating between two wavelengths of light, creating an effect that the light is flickering on and off. “The flickering starts out very slowly, and almost everyone can see that," Mewborn expl
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