Alzheimer’s-Like Brain Plaques Observed in People With Past Traumatic Brain Injuries

Alzheimer’s-Like Brain Plaques Observed in People With Past Traumatic Brain Injuries
According to a new study from Imperial College London, England, long-term survivors of traumatic brain injury who develop brain issues have an increased number of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. The research paper, “Amyloid pathology and axonal injury after brain trauma,” was recently published online in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a form of injury that happens as a result of sudden head trauma, causing damage to the brain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), TBI is a serious public health problem in the United States, especially in children and older people, contributing to many cases of death and permanent disability. In 2010, the CDC reports 2.5 million TBIs occurred in the U.S. and its prevalence has risen over the years. Researchers used PET and MRI scans to image the brain of long-term survivors of traumatic brain injury to test if axonal injury and plaques are correlated and to compare the spatial distribution ofto Alzheimer’s disease characteristics. The study included nine patients who had a single moderate-to-severe TBI event 11 months to 17 years before the start of the trial. Imaging results were compared to 10 Alzheimer’s disease patients and nine healthy individuals. PET scans detected plaques through a marker, while MRI used diffusion tensor imaging to detect post-TBI damage to brain cells. Imaging results showed that patients with traumatic brain injury and patients with Alzhe
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