Small Test with Ten Alzheimer’s Patients Shows Program Reversed Early Cognitive Decline, Improved Symptoms

Small Test with Ten Alzheimer’s Patients Shows Program Reversed Early Cognitive Decline, Improved Symptoms
Scientists at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging recently demonstrated that memory loss for patients with early Alzheimer’s disease can be reversed — a feat the research team managed through a 36-point approach called metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration. The multidisciplinary program is the first to show that cognitive decline and memory loss can be reversed - changing the foundations of how Alzheimer's disease is viewed. The program, described in the journal Aging, is a 36-point personalized approach involving diet changes, vitamin supplements, exercise, better sleep, brain stimulation, specific drugs, and several more steps that effect brain chemistry. Performed in collaboration with University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, the study involved 10 patients "All of these patients had either well-defined mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive impairment, or had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease before beginning the program," said first study author Dr. Dale Bredesen, a professor at Buck Institute and Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at UCLA, in a news release. Improvements in achievements, such as patients returning to work or reporting improved work performance, were mirrored in follow-up tests of patients who had returned to normal cognition levels. The study, Rev
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