Biomarkers May Help Develop Better and More Personalized Alzheimer’s Treatments, Study Suggests

Biomarkers May Help Develop Better and More Personalized Alzheimer’s Treatments, Study Suggests
The physical properties of proteins in the spinal fluid and blood of people with Alzheimer’s disease may constitute valuable biomarkers to help diagnose disease progression and predict patients’ outcomes, new research from The Ohio State University suggests. The biomarkers may help researchers develop better treatments in the future, especially for later stages of the disease. The study “Computational integration of nanoscale physical biomarkers and cognitive assessments for Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and prognosis” was published in the journal Science Advances. Researchers discovered that certain physical properties of protein aggregates in the cerebral spinal fluid and blood of Alzheimer's disease patients are altered, and these changes correlate with disease severity. For example, as severity increases, the proteins become longer, more rigid, and more clustered. The team of scientists, led by Mingjun Zhang, a professor of biomedical engineering at Ohio State, used a computational algorithm that incorporated information on the biomarkers as well as scores on patients' cognitive assessments. Based on the changes in the physical biomarkers and the cognitive assessment scores of patients over time, the algorithm identified disease stages and progression, the researchers found. “With a tool like this you may predict how fast this disease will go, and currently we can’t do that – we just know everyone is different,” Zhang said in a press release. “Looking at multiple indicators of the disease all at
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One comment

  1. frederick numkena says:

    I have read about the IL-33 studies, Protein injections from 2014, where has this gone, what became of it?

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