Clinical Trial Testing Nausea Treatment as Way of Preventing Alzheimer’s in Early-stage Patients Underway in Europe

Clinical Trial Testing Nausea Treatment as Way of Preventing Alzheimer’s in Early-stage Patients Underway in Europe
Immungenetics AG is conducting a Phase 2 proof-of-concept clinical trial to investigate whether thiethylperazine — a treatment for nausea and vomiting in use since the 1960s — might help people with Alzheimer's disease by working to slow or stop the early events that underlie disease progression. Thiethylperazine, sold for years under the brand name Torecan, was approved both in Europe and the U.S. to treat nausea and vomiting, so it has an established safety profile. The new clinical trial by the German company — getting underway in Europe (registry No. 2014-000870-20) — aims to confirm an entirely new mechanism of action for thiethylperazine that raises its potential as a first-in-class Alzheimer's treatment. Preclinical studies have shown that thiethylperazine acts on transporter proteins localized at the blood-brain barrier — a protective membrane that separates the brain from blood circulating systemwide. In this early work, it was seen to activate these transporters to promote the removal from the brain of the toxic clumps of beta-amyloid protein via blood circulation. Researchers believe that inefficient clearing of beta-amyloid aggregates is a key event triggering Alzheimer's disease, more so than overproduction of beta-amyloid protein. The trial, called DrainAD, was selected by the scientific advisory board of the nonprofit GiveToCure as a highly promising Alzheimer's study. Researcher
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