Top Scientists Starting Consortium to Improve Trials of Potential Alzheimer’s Therapies

Top Scientists Starting Consortium to Improve Trials of Potential Alzheimer’s Therapies
Three leading Alzheimer’s researchers are forming a consortium to improve clinical trials in the field — an effort boosted by a $70 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Goals of the Alzheimer's Clinical Trials Consortium include sharing information and resources to make drug development more efficient and finding better ways to recruit patients for trials. “Combining brainpower to solve this intractable problem is necessary because everyone will be affected, or will know someone affected, by this disease in their lifetime," Paul Aisen, director of the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, said in a press release. He is spearheading the consortium effort, along with Ronald Petersen of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and Reisa Sperling of the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. The consortium will start by building a network of 35 Alzheimer’s trial sites at universities across the United States. The government's National Institute on Aging will advise the three founders on the effort. "We must overhaul our current recruitment strategies for clinical trials, particularly to improve the diversity of our study participants and to reach people who do not yet have symptoms of Alzheimer's disease for inclusion in future prevention trials," Sperling, a neurology prof
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