New Gene Variants Identified as Potential Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s

New Gene Variants Identified as Potential Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s
New genetic variants that may affect a person’s risk for developing Alzheimer's disease have now been identified as part of the national Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP). These findings “will provide insight into disease mechanisms and targets for biological experiments to gain further understanding about the role of these genes in AD [Alzheimer's disease] pathogenesis," study author Lindsay A. Farrer, PhD, Chief of Biomedical Genetics and a professor at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, said in a press release. The study, “Whole exome sequencing study identifies novel rare and common Alzheimer’s-Associated variants involved in immune response and transcriptional regulation” was published in Molecular Psychiatry. The ADSP was developed by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) in response to the National Alzheimer's Project Act milestones to fight Alzheimer's. These include identifying potential risk genetic factors, which are still poorly known, that might predispose someone to develop the disease. ADSP analyzed and compared the genomes of 5,740 late-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients and 5,096 cognitively healthy older adults — the largest genome-wide study ever performed in Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers focused on the so-called exome part of the genome, the one that contains the information for protein production. The analysis identified 16 single variants — changes in a single nucleotide (the genome building blocks) — and 19 genes that met researchers' criteria as probable factors influencing Alzheimer’s disease risk. Researchers tested these genes further, using genome data from four independent datasets, including ADSP’s
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