Stroke Medicine May Prevent Early Nerve Cell Damage in Alzheimer’s, Mouse Study Finds

Stroke Medicine May Prevent Early Nerve Cell Damage in Alzheimer’s, Mouse Study Finds
Fasudil, a chemical inhibitor used to treat strokes, may prevent early nerve cell impairment and sustainment of beta-amyloid damaging effects, opening new therapeutic avenues for Alzheimer's disease, according to a mouse study. These findings could not only help researchers understand the mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s development and progression, but also may shed light on why some therapies have failed in clinical trials. The study, “A role for APP in Wnt signalling links synapse loss with β-amyloid production,” was published in Translational Psychiatry. “Our work uncovers the intimate link between synapse [nerve cell communication] loss and beta-amyloid in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease," Christina Elliott, PhD, a researcher at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and the study's lead author, said in a press release. "This is a major step forward in our understanding of the disease and highlights the importance of early therapeutic intervention." Overproduction of the beta-amyloid protein is linked to development of Alzheimer's disease. Beta-amyloid attacks and destroys synapses — the junctions between two nerve cells that allow them to communicate — but many therapies targeting beta-
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