Stem Cell Therapy Shows Evidence of Aiding Cognition, Lowering Amyloid Load in Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Evidence of Aiding Cognition, Lowering Amyloid Load in Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s
Neuralstem’s stem cell therapy for Alzheimer’s disease was found to improve cognition and lessen the load of amyloid-beta plaques in a mouse model of the disease, a study reports, recommending work continue into this possible Alzheimer's treatment. The therapy, called NSI-532.IGF1, combines human neural stem cells with IGF1, a factor that helps prevent degeneration of nerve cells. The study, “Human neural stem cell transplantation improves cognition in a murine model of Alzheimer’s disease,” was published in the journal Scientific Reports. “Alzheimer’s disease is a leading cause of dementia and there are currently no treatments available that significantly alter the course of this disease,” Eva Feldman, research director of the University of Michigan ALS Center of Excellence, and the study's lead author said in a press release. “We are encouraged by the results we have seen with human neural stem cells in this established animal model and look forward to continuing this collaboration with Neuralstem,” Feldman added. Stem cells are undifferentiated, or naive, cells capable of giving rise to indefinitely more cells of the same type, and from which certain other types of cells can be produced by genetic differentiation. Stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's, are a potential alternative to single-target small molecules, as they provide a multifaceted approach to treatin
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