Improved Brain Immunotherapy Delivery Strategy Uses Brain’s Natural Plumbing System, Study Reports

Improved Brain Immunotherapy Delivery Strategy Uses Brain’s Natural Plumbing System, Study Reports
A new approach for delivering antibody-based therapeutics to the brain by exploiting the fluid surrounding the brain’s blood vessels was proposed in a recent preclinical study. This improved brain immunotherapy delivery strategy has implications for treating diseases of the brain and spinal cord, including Alzheimer’sParkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia, and certain cancers. The study, “Transcranial optical imaging reveals a pathway for optimizing the delivery of immunotherapeutics to the brain,” was published in JCI Insight. Therapeutic antibodies are most commonly delivered directly into a vein due to the invasiveness and higher degree of complications associated with injections to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the fluid found inside the brain. However, improving the delivery of therapeutics to the brain has proven to be a significant clinical challenge, especially in the case of immunotherapy — the treatment of disease by exploiting the immune system with antibodies. Researchers think that the poor penetration of therapeutic immunotherapy to the brain is due to the blockage of antibodies by the blood-brain barrier and, therefore, limited target engagement. The blood-brain barrier is a semipermeable membrane that separates the blood from the cerebrospinal fluid and protects the brain from the outside environment. Arguably the most notable application of brain immun
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