Maintaining Active Brain May Slow Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Disorders, Study Shows

Maintaining Active Brain May Slow Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Disorders, Study Shows
An intellectually active lifestyle may help protect against neurodegeneration, delaying symptoms and loss of the brain’s gray matter, which is essential for motor control and sensory perception, a study shows. The study, “An active cognitive lifestyle as a potential neuroprotective factor in Huntington's disease,” was published in the journal Neuropsychologia. Studies on aging and dementia suggest that a cognitive stimulating lifestyle may help halt cognitive decline that characterizes multiple neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's or Huntington’s diseases. Previous studies on Alzheimer's disease reported that patients with higher levels of education kept their cognitive functions intact despite the severity of the disease. This indicates that cognitive engagement — the level of cognitive activity throughout life — does not provide protection from neurodegeneration, but "rather from the cognitive symptoms that result from this degeneration, conferring resilience but not resistance," the researchers wrote. However, in individuals at risk of Alzheimer's disease, higher levels of engagement in intellectually stimulating activities have been associated with better cognitive performance as well as greater gray matter volume in areas of the brain that are more vulnerable in Alzheimer's. Gray matter refers to areas of the central nervous sys
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *