Choline-enriched Diet May Help Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk Across Generations, Mouse Study Finds

Choline-enriched Diet May Help Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk Across Generations, Mouse Study Finds
A maternal diet supplemented with choline, an essential nutrient, reduced the number of amyloid plaque deposits and improved memory across two generations of a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, a study reports. These findings support the long-lasting effects of dietary choline and suggest that a maternal choline-rich diet may help reduce Alzheimer's across multiple generations. The study, “Maternal choline supplementation ameliorates Alzheimer’s disease pathology by reducing brain homocysteine across multiple generation,” was published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease is predicted to rise significantly in the next few decades — in the U.S. alone, it is estimated that, within about 30 years, 13.5 million people will develop the disease. With no current effective medications for preventing, treating, or managing its progression, there is an urgent need for the development of new treatment options.

Environmental factors such as diet are associated with the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. For example, dietary interventions, such as the Mediterranean-Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, have been shown to lower the prevalence rate of Alzheimer's with some success.

Homocysteine is an amino acid — the building blocks of proteins —  that can act as a potent neurotoxin and has been found to accumulate in

Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *