Alzheimer’s Association Funds 2-Year Extension of Study that Explores Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment on Dementia Risk

Alzheimer’s Association Funds 2-Year Extension of Study that Explores Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment on Dementia Risk
The Alzheimer's Association has funded a two-year extension of the SPRINT-MIND study — SPRINT MIND 2.0 — to further explore the role of intensive treatment to lower blood pressure and the risk of dementia. The funding, which totals more than $800,000, will allow researchers to follow the participants of the original trial for two years, which was inconclusive in its results. The trial was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in an article titled, “Effect of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control on Probable Dementia.” "SPRINT MIND 2.0 and the work leading up to it offers genuine, concrete hope," Maria C. Carrillo, PhD, Alzheimer's Association Chief Science Officer said in a press release. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) "is a known risk factor for dementia, and everyone who experiences dementia passes through MCI. When you prevent new cases of MCI, you are preventing new cases of dementia." The SPRINT MIND study (NCT01206062) was a large-scale, long-term clinical trial that compared two strategies for managing high blood pressure (hypertension) in older adults: intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure to under 120 mm Hg, or a standard approach to drop or keep systolic blood pressure to under 140 mm Hg. Systol
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