Alzheimer’s Disease Duration and Outcome Vary According to Ethnoracial Groups, Study Finds

Alzheimer’s Disease Duration and Outcome Vary According to Ethnoracial Groups, Study Finds
Hispanic-American patients with Alzheimer's disease tend to live significantly longer after disease onset and with milder cognitive decline than African-Americans and non-Hispanic whites, a study reports. The study, “Ethnoracial differences in Alzheimer's disease from the FLorida Autopsied Multi-Ethnic (FLAME) cohort,” was published in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia. Epidemiological data supports a higher incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States among Hispanic and African-Americans compared with non-Hispanic white individuals. Despite this, Hispanics with Alzheimer’s live longer than blacks and Caucasians, a phenomenon known as the “Hispanic mortality paradox.” The neurological and genetic factors that may underlie these differences remain unknown, so Mayo Clinic researchers sought to examine the demographic and clinical differences across these three ethnoracial groups of Alzheimer's patients from the FLAME study. "This study utilized one of the largest series of donated brain tissue to date, looking at demographic and clinicopathologic features of Alzheimer's disease across an ethnoracially diverse group of cases," Melissa Murray, PhD, a Mayo Clinic translational neuropathologist and the study's lead author said in a press release. The team analyzed 1,625 brain tissue s
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2 comments

  1. Bob Roche says:

    I am interested in 1. Duration from onset.
    2. The different steps/progression and what is the next progression.

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