Cognitive Training Improves Reasoning and Memory in Adults with Mild Impairment, Pilot Study Finds

Cognitive Training Improves Reasoning and Memory in Adults with Mild Impairment, Pilot Study Finds
Cognitive training alone — without the use of direct brain stimulation — may significantly benefit adults with mild cognitive impairment, a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, a pilot clinical study reports. The study, “Cognitive Training and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Pilot Trial,” was published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a neurological condition where individuals experience subtle changes in memory. Because 10% to 15% of people with MCI do go on to develop Alzheimer’s, it is considered a disease risk factor. Without treatment to halt cognitive decline and prevent progression to Alzheimer's, there is a "growing interest in exploring the benefits of non-pharmacological interventions such as lifestyle modifications (nutrition and exercise), cognitive training and repetitive non-invasive brain stimulation such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)," the researchers wrote. A type of cognitive training called strategic memory and advanced reasoning training (SMART) has shown good results by improving neuronal functions in older adults and in adults with traumatic brain injury. In a recent pilot study, people with MCI using SMART showed improvements in co
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