Carriers of CHRFAM7A gene Less Responsive to Cholinesterase Inhibitors, Study Suggests

Carriers of CHRFAM7A gene Less Responsive to Cholinesterase Inhibitors, Study Suggests
Alzheimer's disease patients carrying a gene found only in humans, called CHRFAM7A, are less responsive to cholinesterase inhibitors, a new study reports. These findings may explain why some therapeutic benefits seen in animal studies have failed to translate to patients. Kinga Szigeti, MD, PhD,  director of the University at Buffalo's (UB) Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Disorders Center, shared the results in a presentation titled, “Cholinesterase inhibitors have a disease modifying effect in AD relative to CHRFAM7A genotype suggesting an a7NAChR dependent mechanism” during the 2019 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC), July 26-30 in Los Angeles. "This research provides proof of concept that since different mechanisms are at work in Alzheimer's in different patients, we need to develop more personalized treatments that will prove more effective in individuals," Szigeti, who is also an associate professor of neurology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB, said in a press release. Preclinical studies have suggested that a cellular receptor, called a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7 nAChR), plays a key role in Alzheimer's. The receptor, found in brain regions controlling cognition and memory, is activated by the neurotransmitter (a chemical messenger) acetylcholine, which is involved in memory and learning. In Alzheimer's, beta-amyloid has a h
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