Diet Rich in Choline Aids Memory and Lowers Risk of Dementia, Study Suggests

Diet Rich in Choline Aids Memory and Lowers Risk of Dementia, Study Suggests
A diet rich in phosphatidylcholine, a form of the choline found in foods like eggs and meat, was linked to a lower risk of dementia and better memory skills in middle-aged men in Finland, a recent study reports. These findings suggest that choline helps to support cognitive processing, and verbal and visual memory. The study “Associations of dietary choline intake with risk of incident dementia and with cognitive performance: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study” was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Environmental factors such as diet are associated with the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Previous studies have shown that consumption of choline-rich foods — like eggs (egg yolk), liver and other meats, dairy, and fruits/vegetables — are associated with better outcomes on cognitive tests. Choline, an essential vitamin-like nutrient, is used by cells to build key components (certain fats) of cell membranes. It is also used by the body to produce acetylcholine, an important neurotransmitter essential for brain and nervous system functions, including memory. (Neurotransmitters are chemicals that allow nerve cells in the brain to communicate.) Choline is mostly found in foods in its phosphatidylcholine form, and is currently part of a multinutrient drink given to people with early Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the
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