Scientists Identify Compounds That Can Protect Brain Mitochondria From Damage Associated With Alzheimer’s

Scientists Identify Compounds That Can Protect Brain Mitochondria From Damage Associated With Alzheimer’s
A new screening assay has identified small molecules capable of protecting brain mitochondria from stress conditions that commonly occur in Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. These preclinical results in mice support the therapeutic potential of these newly discovered compounds. The study, "Neuron-based high-content assay and screen for CNS active mitotherapeutics,"was published in Science Advances. Mitochondria, the organelles that provide energy to cells, are critical for cellular health and survival, especially for nerve cells (neurons). Impairments in mitochondria dynamics and function are a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Therapies that protect and enhance mitochondrial function are thus a potential strategy to prevent the neurodegeneration associated with these diseases. "It hasn't yet been emphasized in the search for effective therapeutics, but mitochondrial failure is a feature of many neurodegenerative disorders and something that must be corrected if neurons are to survive," Ronald Davis, neuroscience professor at Scripps Research and the study’s lead author, said in a press release. "So I'm a big believer that finding mitochondria-protecting molecules is the way to go against these diseases," he added. Previous stu
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