Soybean Oil Can Disrupt Genes in Brain in Ways Linked to Disease, Mouse Study Finds

Soybean Oil Can Disrupt Genes in Brain in Ways Linked to Disease, Mouse Study Finds
Soybean oil, an increasingly common cooking oil, especially in the United States, can cause changes in the brain that could be linked to diabetes, inflammation, and brain disorders, an early study in mice suggests. This oil, a type of polyunsaturated fat, is used to fry fast foods, added to packaged meals and snacks, and fed to farm animals. Its consumption in the U.S. rose 1,000 times throughout the 20th century, its researchers noted. The study, “Dysregulation of Hypothalamic Gene Expression and the Oxytocinergic System by Soybean Oil Diets in Male Mice,” was published in Endocrinology. Most diet-induced obesity studies focus on the role of saturated fats, such as those found in animal fat. But increasing evidence suggests that polyunsaturated fatty acids that are high in linoleic acid — a fatty acid molecule in the omega-6 family — also contribute to obesity. Previous work by researchers at the University of California, Riverside (UCR), linked soybean oil with obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, and fatty liver in mice. [Its earlier work also found that polyunsaturated fatty acids high in linoleic acid — a fatty acid molecule in the
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