Moderate Drinking Linked to Lower Amyloid-Beta Levels, Study Says

Moderate Drinking Linked to Lower Amyloid-Beta Levels, Study Says
Moderate lifetime alcohol intake in middle-aged and older people who don't show signs of dementia is associated with lower deposits of amyloid-beta, the protein that forms toxic aggregates in the brain and is thought to be involved in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, a study from Korea found. The study, “Association of moderate alcohol intake with in vivo amyloid-beta deposition in human brain: A cross-sectional study,” was published in the journal PLOS Medicine. Previous research has shown that moderate alcohol intake might be protective against the development of Alzheimer's disease. Preclinical studies done in mice and cells grown in the lab have revealed that alcohol can confer such protection by attenuating molecular disease-causing mechanisms related to amyloid-beta. However, whether moderate alcohol intake exerts this protective effect by decreasing the accumulation of amyloid-beta in the brain or through an amyloid-independent mechanism is still not known. The researchers explored the link between alcohol consumption and Alzheimer's disease in 414 individuals between the ages of 56 and 90 without dementia or alcohol-related disorders. Of these, 280 had normal cognition, and 134 had mild cognitive impairment, a neurological condition in which individuals experience subtle changes in memory. The mean age of the group was 70.9. These individuals participated in the ongoing Korean Brain Ag
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