Stroke Medicine May Prevent Beta-Amyloid Accumulation in Early Alzheimer’s, Mouse Study Shows

Stroke Medicine May Prevent Beta-Amyloid Accumulation in Early Alzheimer’s, Mouse Study Shows
A medicine being developed to treat stroke patients may help protect the brain from Alzheimer's disease by suppressing the accumulation of toxic amyloid-beta during the early stages of the disease and preventing memory loss, a mouse study shows. The study “3K3A-activated protein C blocks amyloidogenic BACE1 pathway and improves functional outcome in mice” was published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine "Our present data support the idea that 3K3A-APC holds potential as an effective anti-amyloid-β [beta] therapy for early stage Alzheimer's disease in humans," Berislav V. Zlokovic, lead author of the study, said in a press release. Zlokovic is director of the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. 3K3A-APC, a genetically modified form of a natural human blood protein called activated protein C (APC), was shown to have beneficial therapeutic effects in mouse models of stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The therapy reduces inflammation and protects neurons from a programmed cell death (called apoptosis). It also helps maintain the integrity of cells that line the walls of blood vessels after an injury and those of the blood brain barrier, a highly selective membrane that shields the central nervous system from the general blood circulation. Researchers at the University of Southern California hypothesized that becau
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