Large Study Finds No Evidence That Low-dose Aspirin Reduces Alzheimer’s Risk

Large Study Finds No Evidence That Low-dose Aspirin Reduces Alzheimer’s Risk
Taking daily low-dose aspirin does not seem to reduce the risk of dementia, cognitive decline, or Alzheimer's disease, new clinical trial data show. The results were published in Neurology in a study, titled "Randomized placebo-controlled trial of the effects of aspirin on dementia and cognitive decline." Aspirin is a widely-used anti-inflammatory medication. Among its uses, low-dose daily aspirin is taken to decrease the likelihood of future heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack. Increased inflammation, particularly in the brain, has been associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. Because of this, low-dose daily aspirin is thought to potentially help reduce the risk of Alzheimer's, but this idea hasn't been rigorously tested. The Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) clinical trial (NCT01038583) enrolled 19,114 people, 70 or older, in Australia and the United States. For African-American and Hispanic participants in the U.S., the age limit was lowered to 65 years, because of their higher risk of disease. At enrollment, all participants
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