Magdalena Kegel,  —

Magdalena is a writer with a passion for bridging the gap between the people performing research, and those who want or need to understand it. She writes about medical science and drug discovery. She holds an MS in Pharmaceutical Bioscience and a PhD — spanning the fields of psychiatry, immunology, and neuropharmacology — from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Articles by Magdalena Kegel

Is Alzheimer’s a Medically Transmittable Disease? The Debate Continues

In September 2015, a study published in the journal Nature significantly stirred the scientific community and made people around the world understandably alarmed. The research suggested that Alzheimer’s disease might be transmittable through injections of the disease-driving protein amyloid-β. Researchers all over the world now race to further investigate these…

CONy16: New Alzheimer’s Phase 3 Tests of Amyloid-Beta Immunotherapies and an Exclusive Interview with Researcher

Two previously failed drug candidates, Eli Lilly’s Solanezumab and Roche’s Gantenerumab, are again under clinical study for Alzheimer’s disease. Both drugs are immunotherapies targeting amyloid-beta in the brain, a target that researchers — including Dr. Michael Geschwind, who spoke with Alzheimer’s News Today — think has the potential to revolutionize…

Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarker Found; May Help Diagnosis Disease

Tel Aviv University and Harvard researchers have found a new biomarker for cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Diagnosing Alzheimer’s is not an easy task. The process employs measurements of memory impairment, cognitive skills, functional abilities, and behavioral changes, as well as brain imaging and analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid.

Alzheimer’s and Diabetes Exhibit Same Neuronal Damaging Process

Researchers at the Scintillon Institute for Biomedical and Bioenergy Research, San Diego, have discovered that the high blood sugar levels that mark type 2 diabetes and the plaque-forming β-amyloid protein found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause the same alterations in several brain enzymes. The findings explain the association long observed between AD and diabetes. The results,…

Alzheimer’s Disease Appears to Be Driven by Brain Inflammation

British researchers recently identified a protein driving brain inflammation, CSF1R, which they think may be the driving force behind the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study, “Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R inhibits microglial proliferation and prevents the progression of Alzheimer’s-like pathology” and published in the journal Brain, could be a significant step forward in…